First Signs of Spring at Brodie Castle

While much of Scotland has snow on the ground, the National Trust for Scotland’s Brodie Castle is already looking forward to Spring, as some of its daffodil bulbs are starting to sprout.

The famous Brodie daffodils are beginning to poke their green shoots through the snow, showing that spring is well and truly on its way.

The historic estate, which is cared for by the conservation charity, has one of Scotland’s most important and impressive daffodil collections.

The bright blooms usually start to appear in mid-March and can be enjoyed through to late April.

One of the earliest daffodils to appear this year is Coulmony, named after a local Nairnshire estate.

The hybrid, a cross between Broughshane, the seed parent and Niphetos, the pollen parent, was registered in 1957 and has yellow petal (Perianth) and a yellow cup (Corona).

James Dean, Operations Manager at Brodie Castle and Estate explains:

“We are hopeful that people will be able to come and see the wonderful displays of daffodils here at Brodie Castle this season and we are working on making sure that any experience follows government guidelines and is Covid-safe.

“A lot of the daffodils are planted around the wider estate and as such people will be able to walk around the estate and enjoy them as part of their daily exercise.”

Brodie Castle and the Playful Garden, where the daffodil beds are found, are currently closed.

However, local visitors can enjoy the castle’s gardens and grounds which are open daily.

Find out more here