Scottish COVID-19 Mental Health Tracker Study

The Scottish COVID-19 Mental Health Tracker study was commissioned last year to provide data for the Scottish Government to track the mental health and wellbeing of the Scottish population over a 12-month period.

This will allow the government to tailor its mental health policy response to the pandemic as needs evolve.

Commenting on the publication of the second wave of data collected between 17 July – 17 Aug 2020, Mental Health Minister Clare Haughey said:

“This research provides Scotland-specific data on how the mental health effects of the pandemic are changing over time.

“That will help us to target support where and when it is needed most.

“Mental health and suicide prevention are key priorities for the Scottish Government, and since the outbreak we have invested over £6 million in initiatives such as expanding the NHS24’s Mental Health Hub to a 24/7 service and enhancing its Breathing Space helpline and web support services.

“We also made the Distress Brief Intervention (DBI) programme available on a national basis, through NHS 24.

“Our Transition and Recovery Plan, published in response to the mental health impacts of COVID-19, sets out over 100 actions we are taking to address those additional pressures on the population’s mental health, brought about by the pandemic.

“Every suicide is a tragedy that has far-reaching effects on those left behind.

“Our efforts to support people who are at risk of suicide are particularly important at this time, when we know that the economic and social consequences of the pandemic are putting significant additional strain on many people.

“In addition to our ongoing suicide prevention work, we are supporting the additional actions recommended by our National Suicide Prevention Leadership Group to respond to the pandemic.

“The Group’s lived experience panel ensures that those with personal experience of suicide are at the heart of our decision making.”